San Francisco Film Festival Q&A

My 2nd #MCM today goes out to the double threat that is Danny Elfman & Gus Van Sant 🎼🎬 Thanks to @sffilm for hosting their latest film @dontworrymovie on the #closingnight for the #sffilmfestival. The film flips the script on themes of self-destruction in Joaquin Phoenix’s character, and is counterbalanced by @jonahhill’s who advocates that it’s hard work to inspire faith 🌤 During the Q&A the best geek-out moment was when a fan asked about “Weepy Donuts”; Danny said it was a composition he coined for Gus’ 1995 film To Die For, and along with “Final Composition” he repeatedly used those titles in ~50 different instances for other films until his music publisher pleaded for him to stop 😂 Nice question, @nicallardice! 👏 These fellas also stuck around onstage after the Q&A for autographs & more fan questions 👉 sign of naturally talented artists who are all about keeping it 💯 with their roots & why they share it with others 📷💃🏻🎬🎨 📸: #notusedtothespotlight #musicbiz #laboroflove #giveitupfortheorganplayer

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Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot

Film Music Reporter informs that Sony Classical will release the soundtrack to Gus Van Sant’s Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot on July 6. The album features Danny Elfman’s film’s original music and tracks by John Callahan and Alex Somers.

Full track list:
1. Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Main Title)
2. 1st Drink
3. Phone Call
4. Car Crash
5. Stuck in the Tracks
6. Out of Reach
7. The Kids, Pt. 1
8. Mother’s Name
9. The Liquor Store
10. Annu
11. The Hospital Bed – Alex Somers
12. Steps
13. Drawing Montage
14. Gymnasts
15. Showing Off
16. Donnie is Sick
17. John’s Speech
18. Weepy Donuts
19. The Kids, Pt. 2
20. Good News
21. 12th Step
22. Texas When You Go – John Callahan
23. Auntie Tia – Danny and the Hillbilly Boyz

Elfman for SFCV

Jeff Kaliss from San Francisco Classical Voice had a conversation with Danny Elfman,  that you can read here. Elfman explains the differences between score in film and how does it sound on stage, mentions the years in Oingo Boingo and what challenges he needs to face while working on a symphony.

Elfman for Mercury News

Today and tomorrow at Stanford’s Bing Hall will take place the U.S. premiere of Danny Elfman’s violin concerto Eleven Eleven. On this occasion the composer shared with Georgia Rowe from The Mercury News how the idea of such project appeared, what was his inspiration and what are his plans for the future. You can find the article here. Tickets are still available here.